PARASITES AND TYPES

PARASITES AND TYPES

By Vicki Yawn

Compromised health is a direct result of parasitical infestation in our bodies. Parasites live off our body’s life-force and the sustenance that we ingest. In addition to a loss of nourishment and cellular damage, the toxicities produced by these creatures play havoc with our immune system and degrade the optimum health of their host. Sickness, disease, and numerous health challenges are the direct resultant of continued exposure and infestation. But parasites can be safely eliminated from the human body.

What exactly is a parasite? A parasite is an organism that lives off the host, the host being you or me. The parasites live a parallel life inside our bodies, feeding off either our own energy, our own cells or the food we eat, and even feeding off the health supplements we use. In recent medical studies, it has been estimated that 85% of the North American adult population has at least one form of parasite living in their bodies. Some authorities feel that this figure may be as high as 95%.

The immediate question that comes to mind when people are informed of this situation is: How can a parasite possibly live in my body and I don’t even know it is there? The answer to this is simple. The purpose of a parasite is to not make itself known. A smart parasite lives without being detected because if it is detected, of course, something is going to be done to eradicate it. If you think parasites are stupid, think again. They are highly intelligent organisms. Not intelligent in the same way humans are, but they are intelligent in their ability to survive and reproduce, which is of course, the purpose of any organism on this planet.

We don’t know why every generation prior to modern times made de-worming a regular part of their lives, but our generation chooses to ignore this basic practice. It is recognized that people in third world countries have parasites. It is also recognized that most of the animals we eat, and pets who live in our homes have an innumerable number of parasites and worms, but for whatever reason we seem to dismiss the notion that we as a modern society might also have foreign entities living within us as well. For whatever reason the medical profession chooses to try to down-play this fact, but this knowledge is becoming more and more publicly aware in this day.

Parasites live everywhere and are commonly transmitted to humans in diverse ways, such as insect bites, walking barefoot, human contact, animal contact, drinking water, eating under-cooked meats and fish, and numerous other ways. Government inspectors do not inspect most of the animals that go through the slaughterhouse. What about salads, or even raw fruits and vegetables? Eating raw foods always increases the risk of parasites. According to the Center of Disease Control (CDC), illnesses linked with fruits and vegetables are on the rise. One reason could be the increased demand for fresh produce. We now import 30 billion tons of food a year. Some of the produce comes from developing nations where sanitation facilities are less advanced or they commonly practice the use of human feces as fertilizer (night soil). The further products travel, the more likely they will pick up illness-causing microbes. It also increases the chance of being contaminated by infected food handlers. Food handlers have been in the news lately because of their role in the spread of parasites. Some people who prepare food, as well as the general population do not wash their hands after going to the bathroom. When you consider that many of the parasites are spread by fecal-oral contact, this lack of personal hygiene may be one of the greatest factors in the spread of parasites. Consider everything that you touch that is handled by others; money, shopping carts, door handles, menus, salt shakers, and everything else — the possibilities for contamination are enormous.

In spite of some efforts to control parasites, their global impact has not been appreciably reduced for a variety of reasons. Why are parasitic infections among the world’s greatest neglected diseases? The illusion is that it can’t be happening because no one is really talking about it. You don’t hear the newspapers and television stations reporting it enough. You don’t see people asking for donations to research parasites. When a topic is rarely discussed, who is going to take it seriously?

There is little research being done to stop the spread of parasitic infection. Funding is very low for any research into this area, even if parasites are the single most undiagnosed health challenge in the history of the human race. We have a tremendous parasite problem right here in the United States, even if it is not being properly addressed. It takes an informed person to take charge of the health of their own body. Research the facts and with an adequate cleansing regime, the effects of parasitic exposure and the continued reinfection prevalent in the course of our lifetimes, can be minimized and brought under control – resulting in reduced illness and disease in our lives.

“Other prominent physicians agree with me; that in human history, the parasite challenge is likely the most unrecognized of all endemic problems. Because they cannot be seen and rarely present immediate symptoms, they remain invisible as a cause or contributing factor to what can be a serious disorder.”
– Dr. Ross Andersen, N.D.

“We have a tremendous parasite problem right here in the U.S. It is just not being addressed.”
– Dr. Peter Wina, Chief of the Patho-Biology in the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in 1991.

“In terms of numbers there are more parasitic infections acquired in this country than in Africa.”
– Dr. Frank Nova, Chief of the Laboratory for Parasitic Diseases of the National Institute of Health.

Tape worms: Taenias – fish tapeworm, beef tapeworm, and pork tapeworm. Obtained from eating raw or undercooked, infected meat. Adult worms can reach a length of more than 15 feet. Pork tapeworms can enter the brain and cause seizures. Fish tapeworms can produce over one million eggs per day. It can grow up to 33 feet. This worm is normally half an inch long, and is usually white/grey in color.

White worms: They come in all sizes, from tiny pinworms to those that look like spaghetti or angel hair pasta.

Red worms: These look just like earthworms. They exude from the colon wrapped in balls. They can reach up to 6 inches long.

Inch worms: These are thick (pencil size), black and bumpy, and about 2 inches long.

Black worms: These are 10 – 12 inches in length and leave the colon wrapped in ‘yellow acid water’. They nest deep in the impacted colon wall.

Pin worms: Tiny parasites that wiggle out of the anus cavity. The have the appearance of white rice and are about 3/4 inch long and are thicker than white worms.

Hook worms: Curved parasites about six inches long, and grayish. Infestation is as high as 50% worldwide. Hookworms grip the intestinal wall and suck blood.

Thread worms: Cream-colored parasites as thin as a thread. They often come out by the hundreds.

Stickpin worms: One inch long and a head like a pea, perfectly round, small ones are white, adults are black.

‘Little fish’: Fish-type parasites with heads and tails that swim out of the colon in schools. They average about 1/2 inch long.

‘Fuzz balls’: Round parasites with fur on them. About 1/4 – 3/4 inch diameter, yellow in color.

‘Spiders’: Has an appearance similar to that of a spider and are colored brown; often 1 inch long.

If you have questions or comments, please feel free to open a new topic in the Live Chat Forum and let’s discuss it! Thanks for joining us…Vicki

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All statements are the opinion of staff at HealthTalkLive.com and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All ideas provided are given based upon information provided, including all health experiences, therapies, surgeries, medications taken, etc., in the past, present or foreseeable future. John, Vicki, other healthtalklive.com staff, and anyone directly associated with the website, HealthTalkLive.com, are not responsible for negative or harmful side-effects you may experience as a result of ideas shared. No other company, person or entity is associated with HealthTalkLive.com, John, Vicki or any staff member; nor is there any association, obligation or interest between HealthTalkLive.com and sponsors, discount participants or advertisers, implied or otherwise, as having any association or agreement with views and opinions provided on HealthTalkLive.com. Prescription drugs have the potential for harmful side-effects, which may also be influenced by using nutritional supplements; please consult with your Medical Doctor and Pharmacist before using supplements of any kind. Only your Medical Doctor and Pharmacist are acquainted with your health issues and are able to diagnose your specific healthcare requirements. No one at HealthTalkLive.com is trained to diagnose and you should never self-diagnose in lieu of proper medical care and advice. Please avail yourself of all diagnostic testing available to you. Statements made may not have been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. If you are exhibiting symptoms or have a health concern, we encourage you to contact your physician immediately.

 

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